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Week in Tech: Designing the Smithsonian Institution’s “Futures” | Architect Magazine

Plus, Morpholio launches a Smart Hatch tool, IKEA looks to disassembly, and more design-tech news from the week.

Courtesy Rockwell Group
Courtesy Rockwell Group

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The Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, D.C., has tapped the New York’s Rockwell Group to design a new exhibition in its Arts + Industries Building which has been closed to the public for nearly two decades. As a “centerpiece” to the Smithsonian’s 175th anniversary celebration, Futures “will spotlight the Institution’s historic role as an engine of the future” and will be “part exhibition, part festival,” according to a Smithsonian press release. The Arts + Industries Building, which originally opened in 1881 as the country’s first national museum, will be open to the public from November 2021 to July 2022 for the free exhibition.

Courtesy Rockwell Group
Courtesy Rockwell Group

In addition to a series of immersive, site-specific installations spanning nearly 32,000 square feet, Futures will include nearly 150 historic objects from 23 Smithsonian institutions and the launch of newly commissioned works and technology projects that the Institution will reveal throughout this year. The exhibition will also feature a “touch-free digital ecosystem” developed by LAB at Rockwell Group. [Smithsonian Institution]

Tommy Sutanto Courtesy Morpholio Smart Hatch
Tommy Sutanto Courtesy Morpholio Smart Hatch

New York–based software developer Morpholio has launched Smart Hatch for its Trace app, providing designers a way to produce sketch-style hatch drawings on mobile devices. “Good hatch work not only brings both textural beauty and depth to a drawing, it conveys technical insight about detail and materiality,” said Morpholio community director Joey Swerdlin in a press release. “Morpholio’s new ‘Smart Hatch’ translates the speed of CAD hatching into the beauty of a digital hand sketch in a new, bespoke, and really fun way.” [Morpholio]

Courtesy IKEA
Courtesy IKEA

Aiming to increase the sustainability of its practices and products, IKEA has published disassembly instructions for several popular products. The largely pictorial guides show users exactly how to take apart their Billy bookshelves and Malm tables. “Taking it apart correctly reduces the risk of damage, and reduces its impact on the environment,” states the IKEA announcement. “Fortune favors the frugal.” [IKEA]

Read on >>> Source: Week in Tech: Designing the Smithsonian Institution’s “Futures” | Architect Magazine

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