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Week in Tech: A 3D Printed Steel Bridge in Amsterdam | Architect Magazine

Plus, LEGO’s sustainable plastic brick solution, misleading hype behind carbon removal, and more design-tech news from the week.

Thea van den Heuvel
Thea van den Heuvel

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After four-plus years in the making, the world’s first 3D printed steel bridge has been completed. Spanning one of the oldest canals in Amsterdam’s red-light district, the 40-foot-long pedestrian bridge—developed by local 3D printing startup MX3D in collaboration with Autodesk and Imperial College London—took four robots and more than 6,000 kilograms (approximately 13,228 pounds) of stainless steel. An array of sensors embedded into the structure will allow ICL researchers to monitor the bridge’s performance, the durability of 3D printed infrastructure, and the “long-term behavior of 3D-printed steel, as well as its use in real world settings and in future novel construction projects,” according to a press release from the university. The sensors will transmit data, detailing the bridge’s strain, rotation, vibrations, quality, and overall temperature, to a digital twin in real-time, aiming to ensure the project safety and performance.

courtesy LEGO
courtesy LEGO

LEGO has revealed a prototype LEGO brick made from recycled PET plastic bottles. The prototype, which took three years and more than 250 variations to develop, also uses strengthening additives, which help the bricks meet LEGO’s safety, play, and clutch-power requirements. A 1-liter PET bottle provides enough raw material to make approximately 10 LEGO 2×4 bricks. The plastic is sourced from suppliers that use U.S. Food & Drug Administration– and European Food Safety Authority–approved processes to ensure quality. [LEGO]

Read on >>>> Source: Week in Tech: A 3D Printed Steel Bridge in Amsterdam | Architect Magazine

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