Menu Close

Sensory Design: Architecture for a Full Spectrum of Senses | ArchDaily

Here are some examples of how architecture can explore the human senses: touch, smell, hearing, and sight.

I Was Born Installation / HAJIME YOSHIDA ARCHITECTURE + YOSHIHIRO MIKAMI. Photo: Courtesy of HAJIME YOSHIDA ARCHITECTURE + YOSHIHIRO MIKAMI
I Was Born Installation / HAJIME YOSHIDA ARCHITECTURE + YOSHIHIRO MIKAMI. Photo: Courtesy of HAJIME YOSHIDA ARCHITECTURE + YOSHIHIRO MIKAMI

Written by | Translated by Tarsila Duduch

A space is much more than just its appearance. Textures, smells, and sounds can strongly affect the user’s experience. Based on this, sensory architecture can transform the interaction between people and the built environment into something even deeper.

CO2 Pavilion Beijing / Superimpose Architecture. Photo: © Beijing Shardisland Technology Co., Ltd.
CO2 Pavilion Beijing / Superimpose Architecture. Photo: © Beijing Shardisland Technology Co., Ltd.

A space that considers all of the senses can trigger feelings such as coziness, warmth, cleanness, comfort, and surprise. In addition to room temperature, the texture of wood and warm colors can also provide an extra sense of comfort. While concrete is perceived as a cold material, you can counteract this impression by adding plants, contrasting colors, and other elements to the environment. There are endless possibilities, so we have listed some aspects that can be taken into account to help you think outside the box and make creative designs towards the user’s well-being.

In sight and in mind!

Our bodies and minds are deeply affected by a circadian rhythm – or a biological clock – so understanding the role of light in an environment is crucial for the user’s comfort. For this reason, a carefully planned lighting design, including natural light, colors, and focal points, is key to improve people’s mood and energy levels, which directly affects their appetite, motivation, ability to focus, etc.

Second Dome / DOSIS. Photo: © Iwan Baan
Second Dome / DOSIS. Photo: © Iwan Baan

Colors should also be taken into account since they have a great influence on how we feel and experience the built environment. People naturally associate reds with warmth and blues with coolness, but here you can take a look at the many other emotional effects caused by different colors in architecture.

Read on >>> Source: Sensory Design: Architecture for a Full Spectrum of Senses | ArchDaily

Related Posts