Menu Close

Rising Tide is a harrowing documentary account of climate change – ArchPaper

Rising Tide, on exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York through January, is a harrowing portrait of the human impact of climate change.

A mother and her daughter at Bainpara,Bangladesh, their former village. Some houses remain but most were swallowed by cyclone Alia. After cyclone Aila hit Bangladesh in May 2009, 60,000 people are still displaced in the Dakop district. This is almost the total population of Dakop. The cyclone hit the area with a surge of 33 feet and the water since then has hardly receded; due to this people lost their land and therefor their means of living. Bangladesh has a total of 6.5 million displaced residents due to flooding and rising sea levels. (Kadir van Lohuizen [Bainpara, Bangladesh] 2011 © Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR)
A mother and her daughter at Bainpara,Bangladesh, their former village. Some houses remain but most were swallowed by cyclone Alia. After cyclone Aila hit Bangladesh in May 2009, 60,000 people are still displaced in the Dakop district. This is almost the total population of Dakop. The cyclone hit the area with a surge of 33 feet and the water since then has hardly receded; due to this people lost their land and therefor their means of living. Bangladesh has a total of 6.5 million displaced residents due to flooding and rising sea levels. (Kadir van Lohuizen [Bainpara, Bangladesh] 2011 © Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR)

By

Extreme weather events are occurring with ever greater frequency across the globe: wildfires rage uncontrolled across swaths of cherished habitats, and heavy rains, often coupled with cyclone-strength winds, are uprooting areas of human settlement and leaving near-total destruction in their wake. The climate is changing and perhaps the greatest (or most visible) manifestation of our warming world are rising sea levels that threaten to inundate coastlines and, in certain circumstances, render entire countries inhabitable. Rising Tide: Visualizing the Human Costs of Climate Change, currently on display at the Museum of the City of New York, is a traveling exhibition of Dutch photographer Kadir van Lohuizen’s exhaustive work documenting the damage wrought, and yet to come.

The project began in 2011 during a separate transmedia study of migration from Central America northward to the United States. Travel through the region revealed rising sea levels and temperatures as a primary culprit for the decline of agricultural productivity, and, in turn, growing political instability and poverty—factors driving out-migration. For Van Lohuizen, such circumstances begged the question that if the climate crisis is occurring in real-time in this corner of the world, then it must also be doing so elsewhere. To that effect, Rising Tide documents the dramatic consequences of climate change in Greenland, Bangladesh, Papua New Guinea, Kiribati, Fiji, Amsterdam, Panama, Miami, and neighborhoods across New York City.

King tide at Miami beach, the water in the street comes over the poorly maintained seawall at Indian Creek and up through the drainage system. Workers are checking if the drainage system is not blocked. (Kadir van Lohuizen [Miami, Florida] 2014 © Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR)
King tide at Miami beach, the water in the street comes over the poorly maintained seawall at Indian Creek and up through the drainage system. Workers are checking if the drainage system is not blocked. (Kadir van Lohuizen [Miami, Florida] 2014 © Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR)

The documentary footage on display is striking. Photography, video, and drone images, and good old-fashioned journalism present a panopticon of the lived impact of rising sea levels and governmental ineptitude in addressing the crisis.

Read on >>>> Source: ArchPaper Rising Tide is a harrowing documentary account of climate change

Related Posts