Menu Close

Moving toward an inclusive architecture | YaleNews

Yale School of Architecture Dean Deborah Berke discusses “architecture of the greater good,” increasing diversity in the profession, and her work at Yale.

Dean Deborah Berke
Dean Deborah Berke

By Mike Cummings

In September 2015, Deborah Berke was named dean of the Yale School of Architecture, becoming the first woman to lead the world-renowned institution.

As dean, Berke has led efforts to expand financial aid, established programs examining issues concerning environmental sustainability, recruited top-flight faculty, and forged collaborations with other schools and departments on campus. She was recently reappointed to a second five-year term as dean.

Berke, an accomplished architect who has taught at Yale for more than 30 years, recently spoke to YaleNews about her plans for her next term, which begins July 1. The interview has been edited and condensed.

In your opening lecture for the Fall 2020 Yale School of Architecture events series, you described a need to move toward “an architecture of the greater good.” What does this vision entail?

The Yale School of Architecture has always been one of the most highly regarded architecture schools in the country, if not the world. It’s renowned for the quality of the design work and has produced a long list of influential architects, including Norman Foster, Stanley Tigerman, Judith Chafee, Mazharul Islam, Marion Weiss, and Maya Lin.

In September 2015, Deborah Berke was named dean of the Yale School of Architecture, becoming the first woman to lead the world-renowned institution.

As dean, Berke has led efforts to expand financial aid, established programs examining issues concerning environmental sustainability, recruited top-flight faculty, and forged collaborations with other schools and departments on campus. She was recently reappointed to a second five-year term as dean.

Berke, an accomplished architect who has taught at Yale for more than 30 years, recently spoke to YaleNews about her plans for her next term, which begins July 1. The interview has been edited and condensed.

In your opening lecture for the Fall 2020 Yale School of Architecture events series, you described a need to move toward “an architecture of the greater good.” What does this vision entail?

The Yale School of Architecture has always been one of the most highly regarded architecture schools in the country, if not the world. It’s renowned for the quality of the design work and has produced a long list of influential architects, including Norman Foster, Stanley Tigerman, Judith Chafee, Mazharul Islam, Marion Weiss, and Maya Lin.

When I started talking about an architecture of the greater good, it was not with the intention of replacing that history of great design and renowned alumni. Rather, it was to build on it, and to say that, within our teaching of architecture, we must emphasize that good design is inclusive. It demonstrates a concern for the community. It produces buildings in which everyone feels welcome and comfortable. Given the global climate crisis, an architecture of the greater good is concerned about our shared environmental future. It produces buildings that have minimal carbon footprints. It relies on sustainable supply chains and repurposes old buildings and materials in ingenious ways. It is concerned with justice. It acknowledges that housing and health care are human rights. An architecture of the greater good can be thought-provoking, unique, and beautiful, but it’s always considerate of others.

Read on >>> Source: Yale News Moving toward an inclusive architecture | YaleNews

Related Posts