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How VR Training in the Workplace Is Transforming Learning on the Job – Redshift

VR training in the workplace is a booming business—especially for a newly remote workforce. Simulated virtual-reality scenarios help nurses, managers, architects, and more learn on the job.

Two learners don VR headsets to begin soft-skills training. Courtesy of Strivr.
Two learners don VR headsets to begin soft-skills training. Courtesy of Strivr.

by Patrick Sisson

In this digital world, creation often starts on computers. But fashioning, shaping, and molding raw materials into a finished piece of hardware or a consumer product requires a dedicated worker’s skill. The same goes for erecting a building—some things simply can’t be done online.

But thanks to advances in virtual reality (VR), these skills can be taught in a simulated classroom. Industries across all sectors have a growing need for education and training in the workplace, from detailed technical tasks to soft skills such as public speaking. Many of these skills actually benefit from the repeatability of virtual learning. “This medium is a powerful way to immerse someone in an environment and can lead to behavior change in the real world,” says Derek Belch, CEO of Strivr, a VR-based immersive-learning company that addresses different training needs, from onboarding logistics staff to teaching management and interpersonal skills to office workers.

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) has studied how VR learners need less time to absorb trainings because they are more focused, and they also are more confident in what they’ve learned. Courtesy of PwC.
PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) has studied how VR learners need less time to absorb trainings because they are more focused, and they also are more confident in what they’ve learned. Courtesy of PwC.

Industrial VR Training for Construction and Manufacturing

Architecture, design, nursing, and more have turned to virtual training. Tools developed by 3M and others have been a boon for the construction industry, training workers on welding and fall protection. New platforms have been developed to train manufacturing workers faster, like a training simulation that Connecticut-based energy company Avangrid developed for wind-turbine technicians. Lenovo’s VR solution helps new hires get up to speed on repairing industrial machinery. Office work has also seen a similar training boom: Accenture, the global consulting giant, uses VR to share recruitment techniques.

Read on >>> Source: Redshift by Autodesk How VR Training in the Workplace Is Transforming Learning on the Job

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