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How the Living Architecture Performance Tool Can Make Green Roofs and Walls Part of a Climate Strategy — Living Architecture Monitor

Living architecture offers immense promise as a part of a climate strategy, with green roofs and walls offering the ability to help mitigate against climate change and also adapt to its impacts.

LAPT Silver: Harvard Business School’s McArthur McCollum Building. Photo courtesy Recover Green Roofs.
LAPT Silver: Harvard Business School’s McArthur McCollum Building. Photo courtesy Recover Green Roofs.

Written By Rohan Lilauwala

Living architecture offers immense promise as a part of a climate strategy, with green roofs and walls offering the ability to sequester carbon and reduce building and indirect emissions (helping mitigate against climate change), while managing stormwater from extreme rain events, reducing the urban heat island and increasing biodiversity (helping cities adapt to climate change). In fact, Project Drawdown, a catalog of measurable and actionable climate solutions, lists Green and Cool Roofs as one of many potential solutions to climate change.

LAPT Platinum: East Building Addition, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Linconshire, IL. Photo Courtesy Wight and Company, Omni Ecosystems, and Nedlaw Living Walls
LAPT Platinum: East Building Addition, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Linconshire, IL. Photo Courtesy Wight and Company, Omni Ecosystems, and Nedlaw Living Walls

However, not all green roofs and walls are created equal – the Green Infrastructure Foundation has developed the Living Architecture Performance Tool (LAPT) to certify that green roofs and walls are designed to achieve certain measurable and replicable performance benefits. By mandating the use of design, construction, and maintenance best practices, we can help unlock the ability of green roofs and walls as part of a climate solution.

The LAPT has a wide range of potential audiences and uses:

  • Designers and building owners can use it as a best practice tool or design guideline to optimize the breadth and depth of green roof and wall benefits. By demonstrating the linkages between benefits and encouraging holistic thinking, it is possible to obtain many additional benefits without significantly increasing cost or difficulty of many projects.

  • Policy makers can use the LAPT as a decision-support tool to optimize incentives, mandates, or grant programs – ensuring that policies that promote green roofs and walls actually achieve the intended performance benefits.

  • Manufacturers of green roof systems or other accessories can use the LAPT as a guide to design products that use more sustainable materials and that achieve higher levels of performance.

Read on >>> Source: How the Living Architecture Performance Tool Can Make Green Roofs and Walls Part of a Climate Strategy — Living Architecture Monitor

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