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Florida to require sea level studies for coastal public construction projects | Construction Dive

Contractors that move forward on publicly funded projects without performing an impact projection study could have to reimburse the state for all or part of the money spent on the project.

Paul Brennan / Pixabay
Paul Brennan / Pixabay

Dive Brief:

  • Florida’s new Public Financing of Construction law requires contractors on publicly funded coastal projects to study how those projects could be impacted by sea level rise before starting work.
  • The state’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has yet to establish a rule standard for the study, as the new law requires. However, beginning one year after it does so, contractors will not be permitted to start construction on a “major structure or nonhabitable major structure” within a coastal building zone unless they conduct a sea level impact projection (SLIP) study and submit it to the DEP.
  • If contractors fail to do a SLIP, the state can halt the project, or, for those that have completed work, seek reimbursement for part or all of the public funds that were spent.

Dive Insight:

The Florida DEP’s rule will use a “systematic, interdisciplinary and scientifically accepted approach” and assess flooding, inundation and wave-action damage risks over the proposed structure’s expected life or 50 years, whichever is less. The assessment must take into account, among other things:

  • Potential local sea level rise and increased storm risk during the expected life of the structure or 50 years, whichever is less.

Read on >>>> Source: Construction Dive Florida to require sea level studies for coastal public construction projects | Construction Dive

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