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Developers see new data analysis and gathering tools as key to more equitable development – ArchPaper

With new ways to track social and sustainable impacts, planners, architects, and more can achieve better results and more equitable development.

The Zibi watefront development in Gatineau, Quebec (Courtesy Zibi)
The Zibi watefront development in Gatineau, Quebec (Courtesy Zibi)

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Even for multi-block, city-defining developments, blueprints often merely represent best-laid plans. The reams of traditional visuals and data used to describe bold real estate projects—square footage, cost, economic impact, and assorted dimensions and proportions—don’t really communicate the true impact such projects can have on neighborhoods and cities, leaving an incomplete picture when such proposals are evaluated.

That’s why a new breed of data-focused tools and toolkits wants to change how development is measured, to reshape what’s ultimately built. With new ways to track and evaluate social and sustainable impacts, designers, planners, and architects can bring more rigor, and ultimately achieve better results, with urban design.

“Bringing the qualitative and quantitative together is where a lot of urban design resides,” said Mary Anne Ocampo, a principal and urban designer at Sasaki, the interdisciplinary design and architecture firm. The practice just launched an updated Density Atlas, a collection of diverse urban case studies measuring population density, building size, and floor area ratio, among other characteristics, to help planners, architects, and developers better understand how different facets of density affect design and cost. Sasaki inherited the project from famed MIT urbanism professor Tunney Lee, who passed away last year, and relaunched it this past spring.

Scenes from one of Designing Justice + Designing Spaces’ workshops (Virginia Hanusik)
Scenes from one of Designing Justice + Designing Spaces’ workshops (Virginia Hanusik)

Read on >>>> Source: Archpaper Developers see new data analysis and gathering tools as key to more equitable development

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