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Daddy Wouldn’t Buy Me a Bauhaus

Daddy Wouldn’t Buy Me a Bauhaus collects the unparalleled writings of legendary British wordsmith Janet Abrams for the first time.

Daddy Wouldn't Buy Me a Bauhaus: Profiles in Architecture and Design Janet Abrams
Daddy Wouldn’t Buy Me a Bauhaus: Profiles in Architecture and Design
Janet Abrams
Daddy Wouldn’t Buy Me a Bauhaus: Profiles in Architecture and Design
Janet Abrams

Princeton Architectural Press, October 2020

Paperback | 5-1/2 x 8-1/2 inches | 320 pages | 12 illustrations | English | ISBN: 978-1616899516 | $27.95

PUBLISHER’S DESCRIPTION:

Daddy Wouldn’t Buy Me a Bauhaus collects the unparalleled writings of legendary British wordsmith Janet Abrams for the first time. From pivotal figures in international modernism to the pioneers of digital media, Abrams explores the ideas, theories, and emotions that fueled their work.

The book’s twenty-six profiles—written in Abrams’s signature, personal, often hilarious style—include Reyner Banham, Berthold Lubetkin, Philip Johnson, Paul Rand, Phyllis Lambert, Frank Gehry, Rem Koolhaas, Muriel Cooper, April Greiman, and Michael Bloomberg. It brings together essays that originally appeared in publications on both sides of the Atlantic, in Blueprint, I.D. magazine, The Independent, and in books and catalogs from the 1980s through the early 2000s. A foreword by Blueprint‘s founding editor, Deyan Sudjic, and new reflections by Abrams, set the stage.

Janet Abrams‘s career as a writer and editor spans several decades, cities and disciplines, from architecture and design to photography and ceramics. Trained as a journalist in her native England, she first moved to the US in 1983 as a Fulbright Scholar to do her Ph.D. at Princeton University, and was soon appointed US correspondent for Blueprint, the new British design monthly. …

dDAB COMMENTARY:

Blueprint magazine was founded in 1983 by writer Peter Murray and others, with future Design Museum director Deyan Sudjic serving as its first editor in chief. I remember the extra-large pages of the magazine, akin to Interview magazine in the US. That format eventually shrank as it went through the cost-saving measures of every other printed periodical. Just last year it was announced that Blueprint would cease printing issues and shift to solely digital formats, something Murray admitted should had been done “ages ago.”

…(Almost) daily reviews of architecture books, the successor blog to A Weekly Dose of Architecture and A Daily Dose of Architecture.

Read on >>>> Source: Archidose Daddy Wouldn’t Buy Me a Bauhaus

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