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Autodesk issues a response after architects speak out over Revit – Archpaper

After a collection of 25 large firms released an open letter to Autodesk last week over Revit’s pricing and sluggish development, the company has responded.

Thanks to Grasshopper integration and the program’s BIM capabilities, Revit is a popular choice for parametric design. Seen here is NBBJ’s Olympic Sports Center in Hangzhou, China. (Shao Feng/Courtesy NBBJ)
Thanks to Grasshopper integration and the program’s BIM capabilities, Revit is a popular choice for parametric design. Seen here is NBBJ’s Olympic Sports Center in Hangzhou, China. (Shao Feng/Courtesy NBBJ)

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[Update: Earlier today Autodesk released a more thorough response to the issues raised in the open letter. See the bottom of this article.]

At the beginning of the week, a group of top 25 U.K. architecture firms representing over 5,000 collective seats penned an open letter to Andrew Anagnost, president and CEO of Autodesk, decrying the rising cost, complexity, and licensing structure of Revit. …

The letter was aggregated in response to a June 2020 Autodesk survey, which asked users to rate the software giant’s performance and of the Revit platform in particular. “Even before the Covid‐19 pandemic costs were under significant scrutiny and the value added by software vendors is now being questioned as never before,” reads the letter….

Now, Autodesk has issued a response through a representative, and although it does present a mea culpa of sorts, there’s a distinct lack of concrete action proposed:

Engaging, listening to and addressing the concerns of our customers is a top priority for Autodesk, and we appreciate the feedback we received in the open letter. While there are points it raised that we disagree with, there are also issues raised that we must take to heart, which highlight areas where we’ve fallen short.

Following that, today Autodesk released “A Reply To Our Customers’ Open Letter On Autodesk Revit,” where the company elaborated on a point-by-point basis how they would address the concerns raised in the open letter, touching on everything from the licensing structure to improving programmatic interoperability:

Like any company, we have finite resources and we make investment decisions and trade-offs based on our understanding of customer and industry needs. And, like any company, we don’t always get it right. (Some of our long-time customers will remember the problematic Revit ribbon from 2010. We own that, and we’ve fixed it.) We have underinvested in architectural modeling functionality in recent years and are working to make that right.

We want to share some of the thinking behind our decision-making with Revit over the past years.

Read the full story >>> Source: ArchPaper Autodesk issues a response after architects speak out over Revit

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