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Architecture in Unusual Times | Architect Magazine

Architects will be able to look back on their response to COVID-19 with pride. When discord was the rule, the profession came together.

courtesy Alvin Huang; USC Architecture A Zoom call with the informal network of USC fabricators
courtesy Alvin Huang; USC Architecture A Zoom call with the informal network of USC fabricators

 

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I assumed that 9/11 would be the singular, defining historical event of my lifetime—like Pearl Harbor, or the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Naively, it turns out. On April 3, the official death toll in New York due to the coronavirus exceeded the number of people who died in the Twin Towers. As of Memorial Day, the fatalities in the United States alone neared 100,000. How does one respond to calamity at such a scale, and which has such terrible economic, political, and social repercussions?

What scares me, almost as much as the hardship and loss of life, are pundits’ recurring invocations of Chernobyl—the suggestion being that now, as then, the systems in place cannot withstand the pressure.

A Feb. 13 essay in The Wall Street Journal asserted that just as the 1986 nuclear disaster revealed the rot in the Soviet system, the Communist Party of China’s duplicitous reaction to the pandemic exposed the limits of General Secretary Xi Jinping’s authoritarianism. As the virus spread stateside, opinion writers in The New York Times and The Washington Post drew the same analogy in reference to our own country.

Read on >>> Source: Architect Architecture in Unusual Times | Architect Magazine

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